Cat CareCat Grooming

How to brush a cat

How to brush a cat

Before answering the question how to brush a cat that doesn’t want to be brushed, you may wonder why you even have to think about grooming an animal who spends a good portion of her waking hours doing that very thing for herself. But there are a number of good reasons why your cat will benefit if you brush her regularly.

Benefit of brushing and grooming

1- Long-haired cats need the most help keeping their coats in tip-top condition, but even short-haired cats benefit from strokes from your brush.

2- Outdoor cats naturally shed twice a year, in preparation for winter and for summer, since they are exposed to the outdoors and the natural changes in the light and temperature.

A completely indoor cat does not have major sheddings twice a year because she lives in artificial light and a more consistent year-round temperature, so she sheds moderately but continuously. In either case, shedding creates a lot of excess hair for the cat to lick and swallow. Without grooming help, especially at these times, your cat can wind up with uncomfortable hairballs from all that swallowed hair.

3- A cat experiencing stress, even a small dose of it, will shed automatically as a response. Since we know how long the list is of stress factors for cats, this can happen quite frequently and your cat will need some extra brushing help from you. So if you know that your cat has recently been in a stressful situation—your absence, going to the vet, household visitors and so on—then jump right in with some extra brush strokes.

4- By grooming your cat you are conducting a health check at the same time. You will be able to feel any lumps, sores or ticks and see ear mites or fleas. This gives you a chance to correct these problems before they cause medical problems or physical discomfort.

5- If someone in your household suffers from allergies, you can make things easier on them by grooming your cat regularly with Allerpet or Dander Free to reduce dander.

6- By getting your cat used to being frequently handled all over her body, you will accustom her to being touched by strangers, such as her veterinarian, the pet sitter or your friends. It is especially useful to make her easier to handle for when you have to give her medication.

how to brush a cat

Tips for how to brush a cat

1. Start young

The first tip for how to brush a cat is starting when your cat is young. If you have a kitten, the sooner you start getting her used to being brushed, bathed and having her nails cut, the easier it will be on both of you down the road. If a kitten is accustomed to standing for brushing and the sensation of the brush and her nails being exposed, then there is no trauma or drama about it.

If you have a grown cat who has not had a good foundation in being groomed and brushed, it will be an ongoing effort to get her to relax and maybe even one day enjoy the pampering. Follow the tips below to make grooming a positive experience.

2. Keep It Short and Sweet

  • The 2nd tip for how to brush a cat is keeping brushing and grooming session short and sweet. Don’t make grooming sessions too long with a cat. It is far better to groom half of your cat in one session and the rest later on or on another day.
  • Each cat is different, but if your cat can tolerate only so much petting, then grooming is not going to be her favorite pastime.
  • Respect your cat’s patience level and don’t push your luck. And think of each grooming session as a chance to reinforce her positive perception of the experience.

3. Be Gentle

  • The 3rd tip for how to brush a cat is becoming gentle. Think of your cat’s skin as delicate chiffon silk. Don’t be in a rush.
  • Choose a quiet time when both of you can enjoy grooming as a special time for closeness. Pulling or scraping with a grooming tool is truly painful.
  • If you hurt her, she will dread being groomed and run for the hills when she sees that brush and rubber mat coming out.

4. Watch Your Cat’s Body Language

The 4th tip for how to brush a cat is observing cat’s body language. If your cat’s tail swishes or is in motion at all, that’s your signal to end the beauty session. When your cat is getting fed up, she will discharge some of that tension in her tail.

5. Take It Easy on Her Tail

The 5th tip for how to brush a cat is taking it easy on her tail. Cats are particularly sensitive about their tails and generally do not like having them touched.

Keep that in mind when you are grooming the tail, especially of a long-haired cat, so that you can move swiftly and extra gently when brushing it.

6. Special brushing needs of long-haired cats.

The 6th tip for how to brush a cat is doing special brushing for long-haired cat. A long-haired cat has to put up with an awful lot of grooming because she needs to be brushed practically every day to prevent her fine hair from getting tangled into mats.

Every time you groom and brush a cat with long hair—whether or not she has matting problems—make it a calm, affectionate experience and give her special treats for being such a good sport.

how to brush a cat

(A) Removing Matted Hair

Mats are painful for a cat because they pull on her skin like a too-tight braid. They are also painful when you try to remove them, and the only way to accomplish this is patiently and gently.

To remove matted hair, first sprinkle cornstarch on the mat—or squirt it with a spray cat-hair detangler—and work the mat out with a brush or comb, brushing gently from the skin toward the end of the hair.

To help her tolerate the brushing, you can put a little bit of meat baby food or cat food on the finger of your other hand and let the cat lick it while you try to ease out the mat with a brush. If she gets upset, give it a break. Try for just a minute or two at a time, and stop if you don’t make any progress reducing the size of the mat.

If the mat cannot be brushed out and is not too close to the skin, use blunt-tipped animal hair scissors to cut it out. But if it is close to the skin, experts caution that you should never attempt to cut it out yourself. It is too easy to cut the cat’s skin and do some real harm.

You’re going to have to take the cat to a professional groomer. If the mats are really bad, talk to your vet about shaving the mats out while your cat is sedated. This should be incentive enough to keep up regular brushing in the future. (If you do have to sedate the cat to remove mats, you may want to ask the vet whether your cat’s teeth should be cleaned at the same time.)

A Resco-brand coarse grooming comb is another tool you’ll need to comb through long fur. Do not buy the cheap combs in pet stores because poor-quality combs can tangle hair. Find a pet store that carries Resco, which makes professional-quality instruments.

The combs come in three sizes, but “coarse” is good for all long-haired cats. Start combing at the base of the tail and lift the hair a section at a time, combing underneath until you make your way up to the head and neck. This may require several grooming sessions if your cat loses patience.

(B) Tear Stain Remover

Long-haired cats, especially white ones, can get tear stains on the fur near the corners of their eyes. You can buy a tear stain remover solution from any pet store to help eliminate these stains. If tearing is excessive, consult your veterinarian.

7. special brushing needs of hairless cats

  • The 7th tip for how to brush a cat is doing special brushing for hairless cat. Hairless cats actually get dirty more quickly and need to be groomed more often than those with hair because their skin gets greasy.
  • Use a soft human baby brush. For Sphynx cats (who are covered in a fine down), you need a rubber currycomb to massage her skin in circular motions to remove the loose down and release the oils on her skin.
  • Hairless cats need frequent baths, as often as once a week. For touch-ups in between bath times, you can use unscented baby wipes, which gently remove the surface grease.

8. IF you cat hates brushing

The 8th tip for how to brush a cat that doesn’t want to be brushed is handling your cat. Some cats just cannot stand to be brushed and fussed over.

If you have tried everything you can think of to make grooming a pleasurable experience and your cat still gets all worked up and fights you, you should consider using a product called a cat muzzle, which is made of soft material and slips over the cat’s head.

Ask about it in your pet store. It isn’t like an anti-biting muzzle for dogs; it is more like the calming hood put over birds of prey before their handlers release them. Once on, it can have a totally calming effect on a cat, who will lie down on the grooming table and submit to being groomed.

9. How to use the slicker brush

The 9th tip for how to brush a cat is knowing how to use a slicker brush. You might think it’s wacky that someone has to tell you how to humanely use a wire brush on your cat, but doing it right can be the difference between a cat who enjoys being brushed and makes it a pleasure for you and one who fights you because it is miserable for her.

The one essential trick is that you need to hold the handle of the brush low, close to the cat’s body, almost in line with her back. If your knuckles are wrapped around the handle and touch her fur the whole time, you’re doing it correctly. By brushing at this angle—with very little angle to the brush, actually—you avoid having the bristles dig into the cat’s skin.

Try it on your own arm: Hold the brush low and close to your skin at your wrist and pull it up your arm toward your body. Your knuckles should graze your arm if you’re doing it right. Now lift the handle so that the brush is at a right angle with the skin to feel how the teeth dig in when you use the incorrect angle.

Unfortunately, that’s often how people use a slicker brush, not knowing any better. Another habit you don’t want to get into is using the brush the gentle way until the end of each stroke, when you tend to raise the handle up before breaking contact with the cat’s fur and the head of the brush.

Try that on your own arm and you’ll see how lifting the handle at an angle digs the bristles in just as you finish the stroke—another painful experience for the cat. When you begin each brush stroke, take care not to just plunk the brush onto her body and then drag it; begin and end each stroke with kindness.

Use that slicker brush delicately and you will have a better chance of having a content, well-groomed kitty.

Steps for how to brush a cat

(A) Checking Your Cat’s Coat

The first step for how to brush a cat is checking your cat coat to detect any problem ( Ticks, fleas, infection)

1.Wear sterilized rubber gloves

  • This is a preventative step if you detect signs of aggravation or irritation in your kitty’s skin.
  • You will be less inclined to pass germs in to some open wounds.
  • If you find ticks on your cat skin, you are going to have the ability to eliminate them before they could do further harm to your furry friend.

how to brush a cat

2. Recognize what healthy fur and skin look like

Be certain the fur is smooth and glossy. Following your stroke , it must spring back into position. Be sure that the skin is tender and free from blemishes.

Call your veterinarian if you detect dandruff, lumps, bald spots, or even wounds. Although these symptoms may signal conditions Which Can Be treated with lifestyle modifications, They May indicate something more serious such as a hormonal imbalance

3. Search for signs of fleas

Do this especially in the event that you become aware of that your cat scratching more than normal. utilize a flea comb for this measure. Start looking for flea droppings.

They are little, dark items which look just like grains of sand. You also ought to feel flea eggs. Since they are white color, they could blend in with your kitty’s skin.

Other signs include bald spots, skin irritation, and pale and light lips/gums. If you locate one or even more fleas, your cat likely has more. Call your veterinarian as soon as you can work out a treatment program.

how to brush a cat

4. Look for ticks

  • This typically is not a issue for indoor cats, but it is a great idea to confirm regardless of where your cat spends their own time. Ticks are extremely small when they are not gorged with blood.
  • They are brownish using teardrop-shaped bodies. When they are filled with blood, they seem like big gray cysts dangling from their cat’s skin.
  • If you discover a tick unattached for your kitty’s skin, then catch it as swiftly as you can with using a pair of tweezers. Take care not to pinch your pet’s skin. Kill these ticks by sinking them in a little container of rubbing alcohol.
  • If the ticks have their head in on your kitty’s skin, then smother the region with using petroleum jelly. This will reduce and cut off the tick’s supply of air and make it back out its head. When it will out, catch it using the tweezers and put it in the alcohol. Disinfect the region before proceeding grooming.

5.Check under the tail.

Start looking for almost any fecal matter that may have gotten matted in with your kitty’s hair loss. This is frequently a problem in elderly cats and cats have long hair.

It’s also wise to check for little tan items which look like grains of rice. This may signify tapeworm, which necessitates immediate veterinary care.

how to brush a cat

(B) Brushing a Short-Haired Cat

The 2nd step for how to brush a cat is knowing to brush a short-haired cat.

1. Move from head to tail.

Use a fine-toothed comb or metallic brush. Brush with the grain of your cat fur. If you will go against the grain, then you might cause your cat excellent distress. Move softly and gently, however with sufficient power to take off loose fur.

Take care when brushing all around your kitty’s ears. Some cats are extremely sensitive in this region. Many cats enjoy being brushed in their faces. If your cat begins to rub on their mouth or cheek on the brush, then do not discontinue them. It will enable them to love being dressed.

 

2. Brush your cat’s sides and abdomen.

Continue to move with a grain of your kitty’s fur. Brush the cat’s sides first. Using precautions, gradually and slowly move toward their abdomen.

If they enable you to brush their abdomen, keep in the direction of the cat’s hair growth. if your cats hiss or start to swat, stop everything you’re doing.

Almost cats are very protective of the region of the body, since it makes the cats sense vulnerable.

how to brush a cat

3. Finish with damp rubber gloves.

Apply a small dab of plain water into your gloves and spread it around your palm and fingers. Pet the kitty as you normally would. This will assist you relax them and offer their coat a glistening shine.

It will also take off any loose hairs which the brush or comb missed

 

4. Remove fur when the brush is full.

Based on how thick your cat undercoat is, then you may need to do this a many times every brushing session. Instantly pull the fur from the brush. Put the fur balls into the side till you are fully finished.

how to brush a cat

5. Repeat 2 to 3 times a week.

Take note of just how much shedding you observe at various times of year. Based upon the weather, your cat may require an excess cleaning and brushing session on particular weeks. Adhere to your regular schedule so that your kitty could get accustomed to the regular routine. This may also decrease the possibility of hairballs.

(C) Brushing a Long-Haired Cat

The 3rd step for how to brush a cat is knowing to brush a long-haired cat

1. Brush with a wide-toothed comb.

Comb with the grain of the cat fur. If you move against the fur grain, then you could make your cat excellent distress. Move softly, however with sufficient power to take off loose cat’s fur.

Start combing in your kitty’s head and slowly move toward your cat tail.

2. Comb the longer locks on the armpits and belly.

Continue to move and proceed with the grain of this fur. Look and sense for tangled hair balls of fur termed mats, which are extremely typical in these regions.

Be very gentle because you search and brush. Many cats feel jeopardized and threatened when touched within these regions. It may take them many brushing sessions for getting used to being combed there.

3. Detangle any mats.

Firstly attempt using your fingers. Smoothly workout every mat in downward strokes. Begin at the base of the hair matted and slowly work your way upward since it detangles.

When it does not work, Utilize a mat-splitter, doing this in the exact same manner as your worked with your finger . You are able to purchase a mat-splitter in almost any pet supply shop.

how to brush a cat

4.Use a rubber mitten.

Once you place the mitten on, pet your kitty in a usual fashion. This may take off any dead hair from the topcoat or undercoat. It is going to also aid to relax your kitty, particularly if you’d like to de-mat their own hair. The Rubber mittens can be found in most pet supply shops.

5. finish with damp rubber gloves.

Apply a small dab of plain water into your gloves and spread it around your palm and fingers. Pet the kitty as you normally would.

This will assist you relax them and offer their coat a glistening shine. It will also take off any loose hairs which the brush or comb missed

how to brush a cat

6. Remove fur when the brush is full.

Based on how thick your cat undercoat is, then you may need to do this a many times every brushing session. Instantly pull the fur from the brush.

Put the fur balls into the side till you are fully finished.

7. Repeat every one to two days.

All cats with long-haired shed more often than cat with short-hairs. However, long-haired cats are more prone to hairballs and matting.

Every day brushing or brushing your cat every other day will make these problems less likely to occur.

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how to brush a cat
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how to brush a cat
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This article discuss how to brush a cat that doesn't want to be brushed. Follow these items: Benefit of brushing and grooming, Tips for how to brush a cat, special brushing if you cat hates brushing, Checking Your Cat’s Coat, Brushing a Short-Haired Cat, Brushing a Long-Haired Cat.
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how to brush a cat

brush a cat

This article discuss how to brush a cat that doesn't want to be brushed. Follow these items: Benefit of brushing and grooming, Tips for how to brush a cat, special brushing if you cat hates brushing, Checking Your Cat’s Coat, Brushing a Short-Haired Cat, Brushing a Long-Haired Cat.

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