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Aggressive cat behavior toward other cats and solutions

Aggressive cat behavior toward other cats

Aggressive cat behavior toward other cats: Aggression between cats is not uncommon and tends to appear as they move through social maturity, between 2 and 4 years of age. It may appear in cats who have previously gotten along or between newly introduced cats who have mismatched styles of behavior.

Cats who are uncertain, retiring, or a bit shy may not be good with really pushy, young, bold cats. And no one does really well with a bully. That’s why combining households of cats or introducing a new adult cat into the household can be so challenging.

The first sign of the aggressive cat behavior toward other cats in a household may be a litter box problem. Fearful or retiring cats may not want to share a box with a cat who intimidates them. Bold cats might start urine or fecal marking.

It’s also important to note the sign of the aggressive cat behavior toward other cats is often more subtle, though—at least at first. If one cat walks into a room, surveys it, stares at the cat on the sofa, and the cat on the sofa leaves, there was a “fight” as cats understand it, and the staring cat won.

If you have cats who are entering into or are in the social maturation period, it is wise to monitor them for changes in behavior associated with overt (hissing) and covert (leaving the room, staring, covering another cat’s urine) aggression. If the problem is not addressed, the cats will not grow out of it. As it grows worse, one cat may stalk another— without anything we humans would recognize as provocation—and become wholly focused on driving that cat out of the house.

If you have a real cat fight on your hands, you will have to separate the cats. You want to put the more agitated, aggressive cat in a dark room. And both cats need to calm down.

Unfortunately, when they’re in this mode, the cats are so aroused that people attempting to separate them can be mauled. When stalking or fighting cats need to be separated By:

  • you can throw a blanket over the cat that you want to pick up—or even over both. Tuck the blanket under one cat, scoop her up, and deposit her in a separate room behind a closed door.
  • If you can’t quickly grab a blanket, either wear heavy gloves or use a broom or a big piece of cardboard to “herd” one cat into another room. The room needs to have food, water, a litter box, a scratching post or a horizontal cardboard scratcher, and perhaps a toy so kitty will have the necessities while in the room.
  • You can expect it to take anywhere from several hours to a full day for kitty to calm down. Leave both cats alone until you are certain they can be calm.

Once aggression reaches this stage, it is hard to treat. In fact, all veterinary behaviorists warn people that these cats may forever have to live separated in the same house.

The earlier you intervene in an interact the problem of an aggressive cat behavior toward other cats , the better chance you have of solving it. After that, you have to realize that all you will get are negotiated settlements. You won’t end up with a peaceable kingdom. But everyone can be more or less happy and live in a humane world, although there may be some restrictions.

One problem is that many people don’t recognize and understand that very elegant language that is “cat.” One way to overcome this is to take videos of your cats interacting with each other, with any other pets, and with the humans in the household. Once a month is not too often.

Get in the habit of making a fifteen- to twenty-minute survey video in a few specific circumstances, such as when the cats are passing each other in the house and when they eat, and also video how each inter- acts with toys when the other is present and where they tend to rest.

Seeing where the cats settle in the same room will tell you something about their hierarchy. The cat who has chosen the highest point in the room is the one with the superior social position.

These videos are best shared with a behaviorist to see what is going on between the cats. If you look for and record interactions once you first notice problems, you can begin to try to resolve them, preferably with professional help.

If you can get the cats to calmly interact and realize that good things (games, treats, attention) happen when they’re in the same room at the same time, you will be going a long way toward resolving any intercat issues. But remember that not all of these issues can be resolved.

Discussing the management of cats under these circumstances with your vet, all veterinary behaviorists have suggested setting up several feeding areas, places to rest, and litter boxes. She also suggested the owner put a quick-release collar with a bell on it on the aggressor cat so the other cat(s) can hear that one approach soon enough to avoid a confrontation.

Cat behavior problems

Tips to stop Aggressive cat behavior toward other cats

  1. minimize the impulse to fight between cats by adding more territorial distance. This avoid the cats from sharing hiding, climbing, and perching areas. Raise the amount of toys, litter boxes, cat trees, and feeding stations so there is more than enough for each one cat.
  2. Stay away from rewarding poor behavior. Giving food or attention to the aggressive kitty may calm the angst at the brief term, but it also benefits the bully. Instead, grab the aggressor before she receives hissy. Redirect cat’s behavior using a interactive toy, like a flashlight beam, to tempt it into play.
  3. If the toy does not get the job done, disrupt bad behaviour with the aerosol hiss. When the aggressive cat walks off and become calm, fortify the behaviour using a desired treat, toy, or your attention.
  4. Return to fundamentals. handle the aggressive cats by introducing them for the first time. Give the passive cat the choice of place of the home, sequester the bully kitty, then make the introduction between them.
  5. Talk to a veterinary behaviorist to detect what type of qualified treatment could be useful. Certain medications may restrain the aggressive behaviour in the bully kitty whilst diminishing defensive posturing and vocalizing of the threatened kitty. Though not a treatment, drug could be a tool which permits additional training to function more efficiently.
  6. Use controlled scenarios to expose that the cats into one another. Cat carriers or even a leash and harness employed in a hall or big area could be helpful.
  7. Throughout the controlled and restricted meetings, then feed your cats yummy foods or participate in play. They’ll learn how to connect and play each other with positive rewards, fun and pleasure.
  8. Attempt pheromones to minimize cat tensions. Pet stores sell a product that is mimicking natural cat odor and people can not smell it and is spread via a diffuser.
  9. Select at least one bathroom location and one feeding location. If you have the available resources, adding an extra is even better.

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Aggressive cat behavior toward other cats
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Aggressive cat behavior toward other cats
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Aggressive cat behavior toward other cats. Aggression between cats is not uncommon and tends to appear as they move through social maturity, between 2 and 4 years of age. It may appear in cats who have previously gotten along or between newly introduced cats who have mismatched styles of behavior.
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Aggressive cat behavior

Aggressive cat behavior

Aggressive cat behavior toward other cats. Aggression between cats is not uncommon and tends to appear as they move through social maturity, between 2 and 4 years of age. It may appear in cats who have previously gotten along or between newly introduced cats who have mismatched styles of behavior.

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